STLR Link Round Up – October 2, 2015

New Rules Require Credit Cards to Use Security Chips As of October 1, retailers may be liable for fraudulent transactions at their stores if they fail to use chip cards. Visa and MasterCard set the deadline for the new rules as part of their agreement with various retailers and banks, and American Express will be shifting liability to their retail partners on October 16. The new rules follow President Obama’s executive order last year mandating Continue Reading →

The Legislative Response to Patent Trolls

Patent litigation could reach an all-time high in 2015. Sixty-eight percent of patent lawsuits filed this year were filed by patent trolls, defined by one law professor as “patent owners who do not provide end products or services themselves, but who do demand royalties as a price for authorizing the work of others.”[1] Recently, legislation has been introduced in Congress to stop the trolls—also known as non-practicing entities (NPEs), patent assertion entities (PAEs), or patent monetization Continue Reading →

STLR Link Round – September 25, 2015

Xi Jinping Seeks to Reassure American Business and Tech Community As part of a busy week-long U.S. Tour, President Xi Jinping of China has reached an agreement with President Barack Obama of the U.S. that neither country’s government will conduct or support cyber-theft of intellectual property or trade secrets for commercial advantage. The deal establishes a law-enforcement dialogue between specific senior officials in both countries, who will be responsible for analyzing incoming requests for legal Continue Reading →

Google Continues Aggressive Move into Robotics

Following an aggressive strategy to acquire numerous robotics companies, Google is continuing its push into the robotics field by seeking valuable patent rights. While traditionally known for its Internet search algorithm, Google has sought to create product lines of hardware, with varying degrees of success. The Android has captured a substantial portion of the smartphone market. Google’s driverless car, while apparently high-functioning in tests, may still be illegal in the vast majority of states (though Continue Reading →

Your (non)public data is showing.

Background Insider trading, though the iconic vision of Wall Street fraud and the subject of many dramatic trials and movies, is not expressly proscribed by any law or regulation in the United States. “Section 10(b) of the 1934 Act, 15 U.S.C. § 78j(b), prohibits the use ‘in connection with the purchase or sale of any security . . . [of] any manipulative or deceptive device or contrivance in contravention of such rules and regulations as Continue Reading →

ACLU’s Latest Challenge to Government Mass Surveillance: Wikimedia et al. v. NSA

The Wikimedia Foundation, the nonprofit organization that runs Wikipedia, filed suit against the NSA to stop Upstream surveillance because mass surveillance violates the privacy necessary for the free exchange of knowledge in the Wikimedia community. Plaintiffs also include the Human Rights Watch, Amnesty International, and other advocacy organizations whose activities are affected by NSA mass surveillance due to violations of privacy rights. Upstream surveillance is the NSA’s surveillance of the Internet traffic through the Internet Continue Reading →

King v. Burwell – Is the ACA in Danger?

Introduction No doubt, in the upcoming 2016 election, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) will be one of the main issues. Due to some recent cases, most notably King v. Burwell, parts of the ACA may be struck down. This will result in huge implications to the public as well as parties vying for the presidential seat next fall. King v. Burwell – Background and Implications King v. Burwell is a challenge to a key component of Continue Reading →

STLR Link Round Up – April 7

Google Receives Patent for Robot Personalities The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office recently awarded Google a patent for “methods and systems for robot personality development.” The patent describes a cloud-based system whereby a user could choose and download different personalities to a robot. The robot will further “develop” its personality based on information from the owner’s electronic devices – such as phones or tablets – as well as from speech and facial patterns. Some, however, Continue Reading →

Interpreting the BPCIA – Is the “Patent Dance” Mandatory?

Background Biologics are a type of therapeutics derived from, or made by, the biological processes of a living organism, such as human cells, animals, microorganisms, or yeast.1 Examples of biologics include some vaccines, blood or blood components, hormones, and antibodies. Unlike standard chemical drugs, which are relatively small molecules, biologics are often large and complex molecules that are not easily produced through synthetic manufacturing pathways. Due to their production mechanism, it is difficult to create Continue Reading →

STLR Link Round Up – March 27, 2015

Google’s First Privacy Loss A UK Court of Appeal ruled that safari users will retain their right to sue Google over alleged misuse of privacy settings. Safari users argued that Google, bypassing individual Safari security settings, installed tracking cookies on their computer. Plaintiffs alleged that this allowed Google to gather individual data about the user to target them with advertising, which Safari, unlike other browsers, aims to prevent. The initial right to action was established Continue Reading →