Virtual Reality Meets Body Ink

The video game industry has swelled into a $20 billion market in the United States alone.[1] With industry growth, game developers continue to push the limits of digital graphics, inching closer every year to on-screen renderings that bear an uncanny resemblance to the real world.[2] This collision course into the uncanny valley, however, may have hit its first of many unexpected obstacles: the also-surging tattoo industry.[3] Sports games are the third-most popular video game genre Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – Oct. 24, 2014

President Obama Nominates New Director of the USPTO On Thursday, October 16, President Barack Obama nominated Michelle Lee to be the next director of the United States Patent and Trademarks Office (USPTO) following former director David Kappos’ resignation last year. Formerly a Partner at Silicon Valley firm Fenwick & West, Lee served as Google’s deputy general counsel from 2003 to 2012 before serving as the Director of the Silicon Valley Office of the USPTO. She Continue Reading →

Regulating Ridesharing

The pink moustaches that adorn Lyft vehicles are now ubiquitous throughout New York City, and it’s become increasingly more common these days to hear “I’ll just Uber it there” than “I’ll cab it.” Uber, Lyft, Gett, and other “ridesharing” services allow customers to request rides, see driver ratings, track vehicles, and pay- all through a smartphone application. Over the past five years, these services have becomes a major disruptive technology with the potential to disrupt Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – Oct. 17, 2014

San Francisco Leading the way in Regulating Airbnb Regulating Airbnb, the online, community-based home rental service, has been difficult. For example, Airbnb in New York has shown how the deregulated nature of that market leads to complaints from neighbors, springboards for illicit activity, and violations of local laws in subletting, zoning, and tax, even prompting action by New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman. New York’s regulations in response to Airbnb may be too overreaching in Continue Reading →

Will Petrella Apply Beyond Copyright?

For those who concern themselves with remedies, the case law concerning the equitable defense of laches was, until recently, rather somnolent. Two wake-up calls, one loud, the other muted to near silence, have changed largely settled expectations and produced questions about the relationship between laches and federal statutes of limitation. In particular, it is now clear from that laches does not, except in “extraordinary circumstances,” bar actions for damages that are instituted within the three-year statute Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – Oct. 10, 2014

Twitter Fights for Transparency Regarding the Scale of Government Surveillance Twitter is taking on the Administration in an attempt to deliver more information to its customers about the scale of government surveillance. Twitter sued the U.S. government, alleging that restrictions on its ability to disclose law enforcement requests for user data violate the company’s First Amendment rights. Tech companies may report aggregate data on requests for customer data, but only in broad ranges of 1000 Continue Reading →

Personal Data Encryption and its Legal Implications

Under the regime of Apple’s iOS 7 operating system, a law enforcement agency seeking access to a passcode-protected iPhone would send the phone, along with a valid search warrant, to Apple, who would then be obligated to bypass the passcode using a built-in “backdoor.” Thus, providing the law enforcement agency with the relevant information found in the phone. When iPhone users upgrade to the recently released iOS 8 (or purchase an iPhone 6 or 6 Continue Reading →

Undergoing Major Renovation (some links will be temporarily broken)

Hello, As you can see, we have changed the appearance of our site. This change is a component of a major migration to a new server, an up-to-date version of wordpress, among other internal improvements. All of the content from the old version of the site has been migrated. However, for the next few days, a few links (including the perma-links) will be broken as we comb through the site to adjust to the new file organization Continue Reading →

How to Stanch the Heartbleed: Short-Term Fixes and Long-Term Solutions

Experts disagree over the potential impact of Heartbleed. Many worry about the sheer ubiquity of OpenSSL code – which serves as the encryption platform for many Android devices plus over two-thirds of the Internet – and has been adopted by companies like Amazon, Facebook, Netflix and Yahoo. Government entities like the F.B.I. and the Pentagon also rely upon OpenSSL. Two weeks ago, the Canada Revenue Agency announced that its website was attacked with Heartbleed over Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – April 26, 2014

Aereo at the Supreme Court The lion’s share of the public attention devoted to this week’s Supreme Court oral arguments was captured by Aereo, an Internet start-up company battling with traditional broadcasters over the future of how Americans watch network television. Aereo is a for-pay cloud-based television service that allows subscribers to access television broadcasts via their web browser. Unlike other online streaming services such as Netflix, however, Aereo bypasses paying expensive licensing fees to Continue Reading →