Strategic Lawsuits Against Public Participation (SLAPPs) with Evan Mascagni

This episode features Julio Sharp-Wasserman, Former STLR Notes Editor, talking with Evan Mascagni about Strategic Lawsuits Against Public Participation, or SLAPPs. A SLAPP is a non-meritorious lawsuit brought to retaliate against a defendant’s constitutionally-protected speech, or to silence a defendant from criticizing the plaintiff, even when such criticism is completely legal. Evan Mascagni is the Policy Director of the Public Participation Project, which is working to get congress to pass a federal Anti-SLAPP statute.  Evan Continue Reading →

Changing Spaces in Data Privacy with Vivek Narayanadas and Andy Dale

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This episode features Lloyd Lee, STLR Staffer, talking with Vivek Narayanadas and Andy Dale about changing spaces in data privacy in the US and abroad.

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Opening and Closing Themes by Jonathan Coulton (“The Future Soon” and “Ikea”)

Podcast: Abandoned DNA and the Fourth Amendment with Dr. Thomas Holland

This episode features Isha Agarwal, STLR Staffer, talking with Dr. Thomas Holland about DNA and the Fourth Amendment As DNA analysis becomes more ubiquitous in our lives and in the criminal justice system, it is important to examine the current legal landscape of abandoned evidence in the context of genetic data. Abandoned evidence has a long and rich judicial history, from Russian spies to prison barbers. But abandoned DNA may not fit so neatly into Continue Reading →

Podcast: Compulsory Vaccine Laws with Vincent Racaniello and Erwin Chemerinsky

This episode features Sam Matthews, STLR Executive Submissions Editor, discussing the constitutionality of compulsory vaccine laws Professor Vincent Racaniello of Columbia University and Dean Erwin Chemerinsky of Berkeley Law School. — Vincent Racaniello is Higgins Professor of Microbiology and Immunology at Columbia University. He has done laboratory research on viruses for over 30 years. Following on his belief that scientists must communicate their work to the public, he has co-authored a virology textbook, distributed videocasts Continue Reading →

Clinic Attacks Zombies

Columbia Law School Clinic Joins Erie County and the Western New York Law Center to Combat Zombie Properties Students help stabilize communities, protect homeowners and create pro bono opportunities. The following guest post has been authored and contributed by Columbia Law School’s Lawyering in the Digital Age Clinic. In 2016, New York State Gov. Cuomo enacted sweeping legislation known colloquially as the “Zombie Property Law.” The legislation was designed to combat the blight of vacant Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – April 26, 2019

“Facebook Investigated in Ireland Over Mishandled Passwords” The Irish Data Protection Commission announced on Thursday, April 25, 2019 that an investigation has been opened by an Irish data regulator into Facebook’s mishandling of passwords for millions of users. Facebook commented on the alleged mishandling passwords in March, saying that it did not “properly mask” passwords for many of its users, instead storing the passwords as plain text in an internal database that Facebook’s staff had Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – April 25, 2019

“Tech and Privacy Groups Hate the Census Citizenship Question” Although business leaders in the tech industry and prominent privacy advocates usually stay on opposite sides of the aisle, the Trump administration’s attempt to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census has these players on the same team. Both groups filed (separate) amicus briefs to the Supreme Court in advance of oral argument on the issue, which took place on Tuesday, April 23, 2019. Privacy Continue Reading →

Podcast Episode: Moran Yemini on The New Irony of Free Speech

This episode features Jennifer Ange, STLR Staffer, talking with Dr. Moran Yemini about the freedom of speech in the new digital age. In his recent article published on STLR, Dr. Yemini argues that the digital age presents a new irony of free speech. The popular concept that the Internet promotes freedom of expression may be too simplistic. In his view, the Internet, while it strengthens our capacity of expression, also limits the liberty aspect of Continue Reading →

Link Roundup – April 17, 2019

Profanities Prohibition in the Lanham Act: A Violation of the First Amendment? On Monday, April 15, 2019, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments for the case Iancu v. Brunetti, in which Los Angeles clothing designer Erik Brunetti is challenging the denial of his trademark application for the mark “FUCT.” The issue being argued is whether Section 2(a) of the Lanham Act, which prohibits the registration of “immoral, deceptive, or scandalous” marks, is violative of the Continue Reading →

Letter from the Editor

Dear STLR Community, In 1999, a small group of Columbia Law students decided to embark on an endeavor that they could not possibly have predicted would fundamentally shape the way those in the law, science, and technology community think twenty years later. This year, Columbia Science and Technology Law Review, affectionately known as STLR (pronounced “stellar”), celebrates the publication of its twentieth volume. We’re honored to mark the milestone with two fantastic issues and a Continue Reading →