Why we should say “yes” to GMOs.

America is currently in the midst of a non-GMO craze. Genetically modified organisms—known as GMOs—attracted little public attention when they were first introduced into the U.S. commercial food supply in the mid-1990s. This changed in 2003, when a California natural food store launched a grassroots campaign to persuade natural food companies to reveal whether their products contain GMOs. This campaign led many organic food proponents to decry GMOs as impure, unnatural, and a threat to Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – April 12, 2016

Oracle v. Google: We Agree Not To Snoop On Jurors Litigators routinely use the online and social media lives of potential jurors to their advantage during jury selection. But as Oracle and Google prepare to face off in the latest round of their ongoing $9.3 billion IP infringement battle, the judge in the case has offered the two Silicon Valley giants a choice: consent to a ban on searching the online lives of the jury Continue Reading →

Machine Learning and Intellectual Property

On March 15, 2016, AlphaGo—a machine designed by researchers at DeepMind, an artificial intelligence laboratory owned by Google—defeated Lee Sedol, the best Go player in the world. Go is a popular board game played by two people; the goal is to surround more points on the board than your opponent. For years, Go had posed a unique challenge to computer scientists. The rate at which possible moves in the game increase was so significant that Continue Reading →

New USPTO Rules for Post-Grant Proceedings

Since the institution of the America-Invents-Act (AIA, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) has been experiencing growing pains with increasing numbers of post-grant proceedings. In an effort to fine tune the system, on March 31, the USPTO finalized a new set of rules overhauling trial practices affecting America Invents Act post-grant proceedings including inter partes review (IPR), post-grant review (PGR), the transitional program for covered business method patents, and derivation proceedings. (https://www.ptabtrialinsights.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/13/2016/03/final-rules.pdf)  The new Continue Reading →

Police Body Cameras and Public Records Requests: Another Privacy Frontier

Police departments around the country have been rolling out body-worn camera (“BWC”) programs among other efforts to address accountability and transparency concerns in police conduct. Police departments, legislatures, and community groups alike believe that BWC programs will provide benefits in many forms, including lowering the incidence of police violence, reducing civilian complaints against officers, and streamlining internal police investigations. Public opinion polls overwhelmingly support their use, and news outlets have been eager to report early Continue Reading →

Using Bitcoin’s Blockchain Technology In Legal Practice

Although blockchain technology has been around since the 1990s, it was the invention of Bitcoins in 2008 and the rise of cryptocurrencies that began to bring widespread publicity to the technology. Today, many financial technology companies use blockchain and almost all the major banks are investing in it. Companies like Amazon, Samsung, IBM, JP Morgan, Nasdaq, Overstock, and UBS have been exploring uses of blockchain, and the government of Honduras has even started to use blockchain for Continue Reading →

Is Your March Madness Tournament Pool Illegal?

Right now, a cultural phenomenon is sweeping through the country – March Madness. The NCAA tournament causes such a nationwide buzz each year that even President Obama has picked out his tournament bracket. As remaining teams dance their way to the Final Four this April 2, you might be surprised to hear that your March Madness Tournament pool is actually illegal. Although the NCAA encourages fans to fill out brackets for the fun of the Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup–March 25, 2016

Update on Apple & the FBI The case between Apple and the FBI has been getting a lot of attention lately, but things might be coming to an end soon. As everyone likely knows, this case has been about the FBI trying to compel Apple to help unlock an iPhone that was used by someone who murdered 14 and wounded 22 people in San Bernardino. On March 21st the Federal Bureau of Investigation filed a Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – March 25, 2016

FBI Finds an Outside Party That May Be Able to Hack the iPhone The California District Court has vacated the hearing set for the Apple iPhone case that was set for March 22, 2016 after the FBI’s request. As detailed in the memo filed by the FBI, they have found an outside party that may be able to unlock the iPhone in question. If this is successful, the FBI would not need Apple’s assistance in Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – March 25, 2016

Supreme Court Will Now Hear Apple v. Samsung Patent Case The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday (March 21) agreed to hear part of the patent case between Apple and Samsung. The Court will consider Samsung’s argument that the damages for infringing a design patent should be based on an assessment of the significance of the design to the overall value of a product. Currently, courts award full value of a product. However, the court refused to Continue Reading →