Disney and RFID: What it Means for Privacy

Disney has always embraced cutting-edge technology, but in their theme parks, that technology tends to be behind the scenes. In the last decade, however, Disney’s Next Generation Experience, or “NextGen,” project has aimed to integrate technology overtly into the theme park experience by capitalizing on millennials’ use of smartphones to improve the park experience. Users with a smartphones can download the My Disney Experience app, which can be used to book dining reservations, access the Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – October 13, 2017

Equifax Data Gets Breached On September 7, 2017, Equifax publicly announced that criminal hackers had carried out an attack on its servers and gained unauthorized access to personal information of “nearly 44% of the U.S. population.” To make matters worse for Equifax—whose key officers retired immediately—its support team sent a link to a fake site to the victims of the data breach. At a hearing before the members of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – October 6, 2017

iPhone X’s new Face ID raises questions Face ID is one of the two signature features of the new iPhone X released in September 2017. It is enabled by a tiny Kinect camera and sensor setup to perform the same functions like Touch ID more naturally. The facial recognition system is usually 20 times more secure than Touch ID, except for users under 13 years old or twin siblings. Another security concern is whether someone Continue Reading →

Why should I care about EU privacy law?

As someone new to the US, it surprises me that lawyers and law students, even those interested in the technology sector or in privacy law, often have no reaction to the ‘GDPR’ or other aspects of EU privacy and data protection legislation.  The purpose of this article is to convince you to care about this suite of EU legislation which has noticeable global implications. Professor Anu Bradford noted the “unprecedented and deeply underestimated global power Continue Reading →

Artificial Intelligence and its Impacts on the Legal Profession

In a 2015 Altman Weil survey of law firm managing partners, 47% said that, in the next five to ten years, they could envision a law-focused artificial intelligence (AI) tool replacing paralegals, 35% could envision the replacement of first-year associates, and 19% could envision the replacement of second- and third-year associates. As a current law student, I can’t help but wonder whether I can beat the clock and survive a robot invasion. Artificial Intelligence and Continue Reading →

Blockchain in the U.S. Regulatory Setting: Evidentiary Use in Vermont, Delaware, and Elsewhere

Joanna Diane Caytas* I. Introduction In February 2017, the Delaware Court of Chancery faced a conundrum: following settlement of a shareholder action after a contested merger, shareholders representing 49,164,415 shares claimed settlement proceeds, but the class contained only 36,793,758 shares.[1] By definition, holders of over 12 million of these shares must have lacked entitlement to settlement disbursements, yet all claimant shareholders presented valid evidence of ownership. Investigation by class attorneys failed to establish the “current” Continue Reading →

Is the New IPR Investment Strategy Bust?

An October 2016 report estimates the number of hedge funds at a staggering 11,000, managing an aggregate of $3 trillion or more. Each firm seeks ways to make a profit for investors and managers through a variety of ways – including conventional methods like identifying certain market-influencing events, mispriced stocks, and betting that share prices will either rise or fall. Dallas-based Hayman Capital is one such firm, led by billionaire investor J. Kyle Bass. According Continue Reading →

I Am My Own Man: The Ownership of Genetic Material

Our knowledge of DNA continues to expand and, by extension, so does our ability to manipulate it. Recently, researchers have created a viable organism with a chromosome incorporating pairs of synthetic bases. [1] Others have engineered an organism containing only the genes necessary for life. [2] In addition to advancing our understanding of the life sciences, which may indirectly enhance human welfare, working with genes also has direct applications to human health: for example, genetic Continue Reading →

The Tensions of Antipsychotic Drugs with the Sixth Amendment

In Sell v. United States, the Supreme Court tackled the legal standard for determining when the government can administer antipsychotic drugs to a mentally ill criminal detainee without permission solely to render that defendant competent to stand trial.[1] In part, the court required that involuntary medication must be necessary to further important state interests and that administering the drugs is medically appropriate.[2] The Sell requirements were a response to the incredible risks that antipsychotics present Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – March 31, 2017

Congress Repeals FCC Privacy Rules  On March 28, house lawmakers voted to overturn an Obama-era privacy rule* that required telecommunications firms to get customers’ permission to market their app and web-browsing history to third parties. Following the House’s decision, the White House issued its support for the bill. The reversal of the rule was considered a major win for broadband providers like AT&T, Comcast, and Verizon, because they are expected to take advantage of the Continue Reading →