Prison terms for Google executives in Italy?

An Italian prosecution against Google made the headlines again this week (New York Times, Bloomberg) with the news that prosecutors in Milan are pushing for three Google executives and one former executive to be sentenced to terms of imprisonment for their failure promptly to take down an offensive video from the Italian-language Google Video service in 2006. Readers in the U.S. and elsewhere may be baffled at the idea that the facts at issue should Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – November 27, 2009

The latest on the STLR radar: U.S. says butt out: U.S. Senators criticize EU Commission over delay of Oracle-Sun deal.  (See our deal cheat sheet here.) Verizon stakes its claim as the nation’s most ironic network: A week after a court called its “There’s a Map For That” advertisements “sneaky,” but not misleading (catch up here), Verizon has pushed the National Advertising Division of the Council of Better Business to ask Sprint to drop its Continue Reading →

The ACTA – It’s Top-Secret, It’s Controversial, And It Could Change The Face Of Copyright Enforcement

The Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) made the news again last Friday, after the Motion Picture Association of America sent a memo to the Senate Judiciary Committee affirming its support of the treaty. The MPAA condemned the opposition’s “strident attacks” and accused it of an irrational hatred of the entertainment industry. The memo comes shortly after the 6th round of ACTA negotiations that took place earlier this month. The Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement ACTA is a proposed Continue Reading →

Psystar Is Swatted Down In Court In Suit Against Apple

Those in the market for a so-called “Hackintosh,” a non-Apple computer which runs Apple’s Mac OS X, will soon be out of luck, as commercial Mac clone dealer, Psystar, was recently dealt a major setback in the United States District Court for the Northern District of California.  On November 13th, the court granted Apple Inc.’s summary judgment motion on its copyright and DMCA claims against Psystar, all but foreclosing the possibility of buying a non-Apple-made Continue Reading →

Google Scholar – Free Case Law For Everyone!

Given Google’s dominance in web searches, it seemed it would only be a matter of time before the company entered the legal arena.  This Tuesday, Google added the ability to freely search legal opinions and journal articles through Google Scholar.  According to Google Scholar’s documentation, the website provides state appellate and supreme court decisions since 1950, U.S. federal district, appellate, tax and bankruptcy court decisions since 1923, and U.S. Supreme Court decisions since 1791.  The Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – November 20, 2009

The latest on the STLR radar: Google announces that Google Scholar will now search “full text legal opinions from U.S. federal and state district, appellate and supreme courts” as well as legal journal articles. Columbia Law School’s own Tim Wu is one of several acknowledged parties in the announcement, for his work on AltLaw. Competition among flat-panel TV makers to produce more energy-efficient TVs is no longer just a marketing issue in California – it’s Continue Reading →

STLR Cheat Sheet: Oracle’s Takeover of Sun Microsystems

Oracle Corp.’s $7.4 billion acquisition of Sun Microsystems Inc. has hit the IT headlines again this week with the issue of the European Commission’s formal statement of objections, presaging an uphill battle for Oracle to secure antitrust clearance in the EU. STLR brings you this cheat sheet on the issues, explaining what’s at stake, the latest ins and outs of the deal, and the reactions of various commentators. The players Oracle, headquartered in Redwood Shores, Continue Reading →

Court Allows Challenge to Patents on Breast Cancer Genes

Judge Robert Sweet in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York has allowed a challenge to two gene patents owned by Myriad Genetics.  The ACLU, on behalf of scientific organizations, researchers, genetic counselors, and individual women, is contesting the validity of gene patents in general, and is challenging the patents on the BRCA-1 and BRCA-2 genes in particular.  The complaint alleges that gene patents are unpatentable subject matter under 35 U.S.C Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – November 13, 2009

The latest on the STLR radar: Bloomberg reports that Yahoo has settled a lawsuit that accused the Internet search company of allowing unauthorized resellers of Mary Kay products use Mary Kay’s logos in pop-up advertisements. Facebook is sued again for being too free with your personal information: Wired.com’s Threat Level blogs that a Texas woman has filed a lawsuit against Facebook, accusing the company of conspiring with Blockbuster to illegally obtain information from users who Continue Reading →

Twittersquatting: Twitter Is Doing Something About It

Many prominent brand names and trademarks have been registered as Twitter usernames by non-affiliated individuals.  As Twitter’s popularity has skyrocketed, corporations have taken note and become much more interested in securing their usernames.  While trademark owners are understandably concerned that Twitter has complete control over the assignment of usernames, Twitter’s newly-updated terms of service and rules improve protections for trademark holders. Twitter usernames are valuable Twitter, created in 2006, is one of the fastest growing Continue Reading →