Safarigate: Benign Behavior or Malignant Breach?

Last Thursday, the Wall Street Journal reported that Google has purposefully circumvented Safari’s privacy settings, allowing it to track the behavior of users on non-Google sites. These findings contradicted Google’s own instructions as to how users worried about privacy settings could avoid tracking. The report was based off of research at Stanford that had identified four different advertising companies who utilize known exceptions to Safari’s privacy feature that blocks third-party cookies. Naturally, the idea that Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – February 10, 2012

The Federal Circuit refused to privilege a Google email detailing alternatives to using Java in Android and Chrome.  The email, sent from an engineer to Google’s VP of Android and senior counsel, concluded that no better alternative existed, but suggested it stress the viability of Objective C in licensing discussions with Oracle.  The court held that because the email seemed more closely related to business negotiations than legal issues like infringement, sufficient doubt existed to Continue Reading →

Game Changes: Sony’s New Terms of Service

Last Thursday, Sony quietly added a binding arbitration and class action waiver section to its Playstation Network terms of service agreement.  The result: users now agree to proceed individually in any dispute against Sony, foreclosing the option to participate in new class action suits.  The terms also give Sony the option to handle any dispute through arbitration, the results of which are binding and final.  These changes come in the wake of several class action Continue Reading →