STLR Link Roundup – November 27, 2009

The latest on the STLR radar: U.S. says butt out: U.S. Senators criticize EU Commission over delay of Oracle-Sun deal.  (See our deal cheat sheet here.) Verizon stakes its claim as the nation’s most ironic network: A week after a court called its “There’s a Map For That” advertisements “sneaky,” but not misleading (catch up here), Verizon has pushed the National Advertising Division of the Council of Better Business to ask Sprint to drop its Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – November 20, 2009

The latest on the STLR radar: Google announces that Google Scholar will now search “full text legal opinions from U.S. federal and state district, appellate and supreme courts” as well as legal journal articles. Columbia Law School’s own Tim Wu is one of several acknowledged parties in the announcement, for his work on AltLaw. Competition among flat-panel TV makers to produce more energy-efficient TVs is no longer just a marketing issue in California – it’s Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – November 13, 2009

The latest on the STLR radar: Bloomberg reports that Yahoo has settled a lawsuit that accused the Internet search company of allowing unauthorized resellers of Mary Kay products use Mary Kay’s logos in pop-up advertisements. Facebook is sued again for being too free with your personal information: Wired.com’s Threat Level blogs that a Texas woman has filed a lawsuit against Facebook, accusing the company of conspiring with Blockbuster to illegally obtain information from users who Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – November 6, 2009

The latest on the STLR radar: Patently-O wonders whether the Supreme Court might take the opportunity afforded by the upcoming Bilski method patent case to scrap software patents, and states the socio-economic case for abandoning them. Engineering crime scenes: Lawyers.com considers a study which suggests that fabricating DNA evidence is far from science fiction. On the Edges of Science and Law blogs about the latest developments in the challenge to the constitutionality and validity of Continue Reading →

STLR Publishes New Article Addressing In re Bilski and Invention Incentives

STLR is pleased to announce the publication of the fall issue of STLR Volume XI. The article entitled Predictability and Patentable Processes: The Federal Circuit’s In re Bilski Decision and Its Effect on the Incentive to Invent discusses the Federal Circuit’s most recent en banc decision addressing the scope of patentable subject matter under § 101.  In Bilski, the court reformulated the semi-positive Machine or Transformation test articulated in Supreme Court precedent into a positive Continue Reading →

STLR Volume X

STLR Volume X has been published, and is available in full from the Volume X archive page. We’re excited about the quality of the pieces in this volume. Articles include pieces on computer simulation of patent economics, reformation of the mailbox rule, and research fraud.  In addition, there are pieces on patent judges, KSR, eBay, and patent insurance. In addition to the high quality of our articles, we’re excited to announce that with this volume Continue Reading →

US v. Miller and “Voluntary” Data Handover, c. 2009

In United States v. Miller, the Supreme Court held that there is no reasonable expectation of privacy in financial records maintained by a bank, because the information was voluntarily conveyed by the defendant to a third party (the bank). With new legislation mandating more data retention in the works, this is an appropriate time to reexamine what the term “voluntary” means with respect to online third party services given the state of the world 33 Continue Reading →

Durham Statement on Open Access

A group of law librarians recently published the Durham Statement on Open Access, calling on law journals to “mak[e] the legal scholarship they publish available in stable, open, digital formats in place of print.” The rationale, which is well worth reading, includes issues both timely (the economy) and timeless (the environment and access to education). STLR has been ahead of the curve on this front, choosing since our inception to publish only online and in Continue Reading →

John McCain and the Music Makers

Senator John McCain’s presidential campaign recently raised the hackles of a number of prominent recording artists for using their music in TV ads and at rallies.1 The all-star lineup of affronted artists included Van Halen (for use of “Right Now;” they also objected to George W. Bush’s use in 2004), Foo Fighters (for use of “My Hero” at rallies),John Mellencamp (for use of “Pink Houses”), Jackson Browne (for use of “Running on Empty” by the Continue Reading →

Amazon Kindle and Sony Reader Locked Up: Why Your Books Are No Longer Yours

Many users are unhappy that e-book readers, such as the Sony Reader and the Amazon Kindle, restrict the sharing, borrowing and transferring of e-books. While some argue that the “first sale” doctrine should allow users to transfer an e-book in the same manner as a hard-copy book, these contentious restrictions may be valid under current law. The Sony Reader and the Amazon Kindle The Sony Reader and the Amazon Kindle are portable media devices designed Continue Reading →