STLR Link Round-Up – Feb. 20, 2015

High Profile Vulnerabilities Continue to Make Headlines Lenovo users found out that new laptops had come preinstalled with malicious code, known as Superfish. The code is hidden deep within Windows and is very difficult to find, raising the question of how it got there in the first place. Lenovo is providing a removal tool to its users. (CNET) Kaspersky Lab, a Russian computer security firm alleged that groups linked to the U.S. Government had embedded spyware Continue Reading →

City of Los Angeles v. Patel – Facial Challenges to Privacy Statutes and Why They Are Essential to Developing a Body of Statutory Law to Govern Privacy

On October 20, 2014 the Supreme Court decided to hear the case City of Los Angeles v. Patel. [1] The case involves a local ordinance, which requires operators of hotels to keep records of their guests, and to provide them to the police if requested without any judicial oversight.[2] The Ninth Circuit held that the statute was invalid because it did not satisfy the Fourth Amendment’s reasonableness requirements in all circumstances.[3] As presented to the Continue Reading →

STLR Link Round-Up – Oct. 31, 2014

Spain’s Parliament approves new so-called “Google Tax” Spain’s Parliament announced that it would adopt a new tax on news aggregators. (Yahoo news). The tax has come to be known as the “Google tax.” At least one technology blog, Gizmodo, was quick to decry the new law as “bad for everyone.” (Gizmodo). A similar tax was tried in Germany. Ultimately after being blocked by Google, the news sites asked to be relisted. (TechCruch h/t Gizmodo).   Continue Reading →