Police Body Cameras and Public Records Requests: Another Privacy Frontier

Police departments around the country have been rolling out body-worn camera (“BWC”) programs among other efforts to address accountability and transparency concerns in police conduct. Police departments, legislatures, and community groups alike believe that BWC programs will provide benefits in many forms, including lowering the incidence of police violence, reducing civilian complaints against officers, and streamlining internal police investigations. Public opinion polls overwhelmingly support their use, and news outlets have been eager to report early Continue Reading →

Data Breaches and Class Action Lawsuits – Consumers May Finally Control Their Own Fate

The Breach Problem Many times a year we see news stories about the latest and largest electronic data breach. Some scandals revolve around the theft of extremely private Personally Identifiable Information (PII), like the user database of infidelity website Ashley Madison.  Others directly target the wallets of millions of consumers, like the credit card security breaches at Target and Home Depot. Worldwide, more than 1,500 data breaches caused the loss of a billion records in Continue Reading →

Target-ing Data Security Breaches

On December 19, 2013 Target reported that there had been unauthorized access to Target customers’ payment card data, which may have resulted in 40 million credit card numbers and personal information of up to 70 million individuals being exposed.  The Target data breach was so significant and shocking that there are reports that a “cyber-thriller” movie based on the breach is in the works.  Only months later, Neiman Marcus reported that 350,000 of its customers’ Continue Reading →

RE: Cloud Science, Dropbox, and Behavioral Economics

What is a cloud?  I’m no meteorologist. In fact I can hardly spell the word (I mean, I have troubling spelling “meteorologist”; I can spell “cloud”). But I know what I see – and that’s that clouds are externally opaque.  Still we assume they work. In the context of cloud computing, this much is true as well. What is cloud computing? The National Institute for Science and Technology defines cloud computing in richly technical NIST-speak. Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – January 15, 2010

Here’s the latest on the STLR radar: Twitter is a source of evidence for a murder charge, reports the New York Daily News.  But could those tweets be copyrighted?  Law.com’s Law Technology News weighs in. The Electronic Frontier Foundation provides a good, link-heavy analysis of the unanswered questions surrounding Google’s decision to stop censoring their Chinese services. For some reason, Psystar keeps fighting Apple, posts Gizmodo. Custom and Border Protection’s laptop searches may have gone Continue Reading →