STLR Link Roundup – September 6, 2011

The latest links from STLR: Last week, the Justice Department filed suit in DC District court to block AT&T’s $39 billion acquisition of T-Mobile, arguing that the merger violates antitrust laws. Sprint has since filed its own lawsuit in DC District court to block the proposed deal. The Senate debates the America Invents Act on Patent Reform (H.R.1249). These proposed reforms to the patent system are expected to be passed and signed by President Obama Continue Reading →

Amazon Kindle and Sony Reader Locked Up: Why Your Books Are No Longer Yours

Many users are unhappy that e-book readers, such as the Sony Reader and the Amazon Kindle, restrict the sharing, borrowing and transferring of e-books. While some argue that the “first sale” doctrine should allow users to transfer an e-book in the same manner as a hard-copy book, these contentious restrictions may be valid under current law. The Sony Reader and the Amazon Kindle The Sony Reader and the Amazon Kindle are portable media devices designed Continue Reading →

Digital Rights Management: Amazon Versus iTunes

Everyone has heard of Amazon and iTunes. Chances are, you have also heard about the controversies surrounding file sharing and MP3s. But another three-letter acronym that is controversial these days is DRM – Digital Rights Management. With much fanfare, Amazon entered into the online music distribution business on September 25, 2007. Its major selling points? DRM-free music that is cheaper than Amazon’s biggest online competitor – iTunes. What is DRM, and why does it even Continue Reading →

Microsoft’s war waged with FairUse4WM

The press and blogosphere have recently been abuzz over programs that remove copyright protections technologies known as Digital Rights Management (DRM) from purchased or rented media files. These DRMs restrict a consumer’s use of the media – morality notwithstanding, they are the only thing preventing you from copying your music or video files onto all of your friends’ computers. DRM-stripping programs remove such restrictions from the file (and typically violate your terms of service agreement, Continue Reading →