How Should International Purposeful Availment Grow with the Internet?

Courts have used internet activity to find personal jurisdiction in the United States.  Many of these cases have relied on either the Zippo test from Zippo Manufacturing Co. v. Zippo Dot Com, Inc or the Calder test from Calder v. Jones.  The Zippo test applies a sliding scale where a court looks at the interactivity versus passivity of a website to find purposeful availment and is considered to be the main standard in internet jurisdiction Continue Reading →

Privacy Rights Re-“Kindled”: eBook Reader Privacy

There has been a tremendous sea change in the publishing landscape over the last several years. As people have been shifting from buying books in brick and mortar stores like Borders and Barnes and Noble, to online distribution of physical media like Amazon, to the rise of electronic distribution like Amazon’s Kindle or Apple’s iBooks ecosystems, the ease and accessibility of obtaining and exploring new works has been steadily increasing. However, what has remained constant Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – September 6, 2011

The latest links from STLR: Last week, the Justice Department filed suit in DC District court to block AT&T’s $39 billion acquisition of T-Mobile, arguing that the merger violates antitrust laws. Sprint has since filed its own lawsuit in DC District court to block the proposed deal. The Senate debates the America Invents Act on Patent Reform (H.R.1249). These proposed reforms to the patent system are expected to be passed and signed by President Obama Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – December 4, 2009

The latest on the STLR radar: Patent Docs reviews Senator Patrick Leahy’s proposals for patent reform. Third Circuit gives “Spam filter ate my filing notice” excuse a second chance, from the Technology & Marketing Blog. EFF sues to find out how the government spies on us using social networks; Indiana University students makes a Freedom of Information request to find out much the big telcos charge the government to spy on their networks, says Wired. Continue Reading →