Does Lenz v. Universal Music Corp. Affect Copyright Owners §512 Takedown Procedures?

In Lenz v. Universal Music Corp., Nos. 13-16106, 13-16107, U.S. App. LEXIS 16308 (9th Cir. 2015), the Ninth Circuit dealt with an issue of first impression, whether fair use is an “authorization under the law” as contemplated by 17 U.S.C. 512(c)(3)(A)(v). Lenz U.S. App. LEXIS 16308 at 12; Limitations on Liability Relating to Material Online, 17 U.S.C. 512(c)(3)(A)(v) (2015). The court held that §512(c)(3)(A)(v) does require the copyright holders to consider fair use before sending Continue Reading →

WikiLeaks Reveals the Trans-Pacific Partnership’s Expansion of International Copyright Law

WikiLeaks Publishes TPP IP Chapter As the Trans-Pacific Partnership or “TPP” moves closer to becoming a reality , leaked documents of the international trade agreement published by WikiLeaks have sparked concerns that the treaty’s re-envisioning of intellectual property rights could prove detrimental to citizens of signatory nations. The latest version of TPP’s intellectual property chapter, hosted on WikiLeaks servers,[1] details a series of sweeping modifications to the international status quo in regards to copyrights as well as Continue Reading →

Are 3D Printed Tissues and Organs Patentable?

It has been long established, and recently codified in the Leahy-Smith America Invents Act (AIA), that no one is able to obtain a patent on any part of the human body. Examiners are taught to issue 35 U.S.C. 101 and AIA § 33(a) rejections even if claims are directed towards devices that are “attached to” parts of the human body and recommend applicants change the language to “configured to be attached” or something similar so Continue Reading →

The Legislative Response to Patent Trolls

Patent litigation could reach an all-time high in 2015. Sixty-eight percent of patent lawsuits filed this year were filed by patent trolls, defined by one law professor as “patent owners who do not provide end products or services themselves, but who do demand royalties as a price for authorizing the work of others.”[1] Recently, legislation has been introduced in Congress to stop the trolls—also known as non-practicing entities (NPEs), patent assertion entities (PAEs), or patent monetization Continue Reading →

Interpreting the BPCIA – Is the “Patent Dance” Mandatory?

Background Biologics are a type of therapeutics derived from, or made by, the biological processes of a living organism, such as human cells, animals, microorganisms, or yeast.1 Examples of biologics include some vaccines, blood or blood components, hormones, and antibodies. Unlike standard chemical drugs, which are relatively small molecules, biologics are often large and complex molecules that are not easily produced through synthetic manufacturing pathways. Due to their production mechanism, it is difficult to create Continue Reading →

Claim Construction Under Teva: How Much Deference?

The claims of a patent define the scope of the exclusive right granted to the patentee. Claims should be written such that a person of ordinary skill in the art can understand the boundaries of the invention. The language, which can sometimes be ambiguous, typically consists of a mix of ordinary languages as well as technical and legal jargon. Thus, an important step for courts, in resolving patent infringement disputes, is the interpretation of the Continue Reading →

Virtual Reality Meets Body Ink

The video game industry has swelled into a $20 billion market in the United States alone.[1] With industry growth, game developers continue to push the limits of digital graphics, inching closer every year to on-screen renderings that bear an uncanny resemblance to the real world.[2] This collision course into the uncanny valley, however, may have hit its first of many unexpected obstacles: the also-surging tattoo industry.[3] Sports games are the third-most popular video game genre Continue Reading →

Starbucks Not So “Dumb” After All

Last weekend in Los Feliz, Los Angeles, it appeared that coffee mogul Starbucks opened a new franchise. However, this new store proudly named itself “Dumb Starbucks,” and every menu item was preceded by the word “dumb.” Patrons could order Dumb Honey Blonde roast coffee or Dumb Chai Lattes, to name a few, in size Dumb Tall, Dumb Grande, or Dumb Venti. Oddly enough, Starbucks has decided not to go after the perpetrator of this stunt, Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – November 7, 2013

High-Tech, “Green” Cars Could Be the Next IP Battleground In the last five years, the number of patents filed per quarter increased from 20 to 90 by automobile manufacturers. These patents all relate to hybrid or electrical vehicle technologies. Automobile manufacturers are worried that the litigation war affecting the smartphone industry will spread to electric and hybrid vehicles. The automobile industry has been steadily expanding, and questions by potential consumers about battery reliability, driving range, Continue Reading →

Aereo: Signaling Television’s New Frontier

Earlier this month, the Second Circuit Court of Appeals issued a ruling in favor of Aereo, a groundbreaking company providing live and time-shifted streaming of free, over-the-air television channels to paying Aereo customers. To provide this service, Aereo relies on its use of tiny antennae – none of which is used at the same time by more than one user. The signal received by each antenna creates an individual copy of the program in each Continue Reading →