STLR Link Roundup–March 25, 2016

Update on Apple & the FBI The case between Apple and the FBI has been getting a lot of attention lately, but things might be coming to an end soon. As everyone likely knows, this case has been about the FBI trying to compel Apple to help unlock an iPhone that was used by someone who murdered 14 and wounded 22 people in San Bernardino. On March 21st the Federal Bureau of Investigation filed a Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup — March 11th, 2016

Google uses Geolocation to Implement Right to Be Forgotten Ruling Google will use IP address data and other geolocation signals to determine whether a Google Search user is located in Europe. If so, Google will delist search results covered by the European Court of Justice’s “Right to be Forgotten” rulings. Peter Fleischer, Global Privacy Counsel at Google, released a blog post on a company blog on March 4th, detailing some specifics of the implementation. Previously, Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – Feb. 6, 2016

Privacy Shield Data Transfer Agreement On February 2nd Officials from the United States and European Union agreed to a cross-Atlantic data transfer deal called Privacy Shield after three months of negotiations. The negotiations centered around disagreements between European and American regulators on the extent of privacy individuals should be able to expect for their data. The EU and US reached the agreement after the US government made promises that it would not target Europeans to Continue Reading →

Inducing Renewable Energy Innovation Through Taxation

Renewable Energy Innovation’s Obstacles As the Paris Conference approaches, policymakers will search for a practical means by which the United States can meet any potential voluntary commitments to reductions in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Economists have suggested that an increase in the price of fossil fuels could “induce innovation,” as businesses are given an incentive to develop low carbon solutions to limit their costs.[1] To have a realistic chance of mitigating human contributions to climate Continue Reading →

WikiLeaks Reveals the Trans-Pacific Partnership’s Expansion of International Copyright Law

WikiLeaks Publishes TPP IP Chapter As the Trans-Pacific Partnership or “TPP” moves closer to becoming a reality , leaked documents of the international trade agreement published by WikiLeaks have sparked concerns that the treaty’s re-envisioning of intellectual property rights could prove detrimental to citizens of signatory nations. The latest version of TPP’s intellectual property chapter, hosted on WikiLeaks servers,[1] details a series of sweeping modifications to the international status quo in regards to copyrights as well as Continue Reading →

First Grocery Shopping and Now Courts: Unfolding the Proposed Online-Court System for the UK.

In the latest Civil Justice Council report, Professor Richard Susskind proposes to reduce expenses to the judicial system by establishing “Her Majesty’s Online Court” (HMOC), an Online Dispute Resolution system for civil court cases below £25,000. Online Dispute Resolution (ODR) has successfully allowed parties who are unable to meet face-to-face to negotiate and resolve their disputes over the internet. Most often, ODR has been used to bridge the gap between consumer and supplier in an online Continue Reading →

How Should International Purposeful Availment Grow with the Internet?

Courts have used internet activity to find personal jurisdiction in the United States.  Many of these cases have relied on either the Zippo test from Zippo Manufacturing Co. v. Zippo Dot Com, Inc or the Calder test from Calder v. Jones.  The Zippo test applies a sliding scale where a court looks at the interactivity versus passivity of a website to find purposeful availment and is considered to be the main standard in internet jurisdiction Continue Reading →

Sea Change: the Legal Implications of Climate Change for Island States

Earlier this month, the intergovernmental 44th Pacific Islands Forum convened in the Marshall Islands to discuss the affairs of 16 sovereign states in the Pacific Ocean. Members of the Forum include Australia, the Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji and Samoa. Discussions at the Pacific Islands Forum covered a wide variety of economic, political and strategic topics, but the major focal point of the Forum concerned climate change. The topic of climate change is one that Continue Reading →

English Premier League Loses Match in European Court

This week, the European Court of Justice (ECJ) handed down a hotly anticipated ruling in Football Association Premier League v. Murphy, et al. The case pitted the English Premier League (EPL), the highest tier of club soccer competition in England, against, among others, Karen Murphy, a Portsmouth-area pub owner. Why would a billion-dollar sports juggernaut be bothered to take a small–time Portsmouth publican to court? As it turns out, a simple piece of satellite technology Continue Reading →

A Global Convention on Cybercrime?

Cybercrime has been much in the news lately, from phishing, to botnets, ATM hacking, stock price manipulation and hacking cars, to mention but a few of the many forms online crime can take. Though it is difficult to quantify just how much cybercrime is going on, one FBI source put the annual losses to businesses in the United States alone at $67 billion in 2005. In all likelihood, this figure has grown since. Mirroring the international openness Continue Reading →