STLR Link Roundup – March 25, 2016

FBI Finds an Outside Party That May Be Able to Hack the iPhone The California District Court has vacated the hearing set for the Apple iPhone case that was set for March 22, 2016 after the FBI’s request. As detailed in the memo filed by the FBI, they have found an outside party that may be able to unlock the iPhone in question. If this is successful, the FBI would not need Apple’s assistance in Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – March 25, 2016

Supreme Court Will Now Hear Apple v. Samsung Patent Case The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday (March 21) agreed to hear part of the patent case between Apple and Samsung. The Court will consider Samsung’s argument that the damages for infringing a design patent should be based on an assessment of the significance of the design to the overall value of a product. Currently, courts award full value of a product. However, the court refused to Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup — March 11th, 2016

Google uses Geolocation to Implement Right to Be Forgotten Ruling Google will use IP address data and other geolocation signals to determine whether a Google Search user is located in Europe. If so, Google will delist search results covered by the European Court of Justice’s “Right to be Forgotten” rulings. Peter Fleischer, Global Privacy Counsel at Google, released a blog post on a company blog on March 4th, detailing some specifics of the implementation. Previously, Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – March 4, 2016

Pentagon Sets Out to Improve Cyberspace Security Through Crowdsourcing After hackers caused a power outage in Ukraine and hackers in China compromised a major U.S. weapons system, the Pentagon is looking for ways to beef up security. The pentagon is offering ‘vetted hackers’ the opportunity to find vulnerabilities in the Department of Defense’s cybersecurity system in exchange for cash.  Although similar programs have been employed by private corporations (such as Google), the government’s pilot program Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – Feb. 26, 2016

Apple Files Motion to Vacate Order to Unlock iPhone On Thursday, February 25, Apple filed a motion to vacate a court order compelling the company to aid the U.S. government in unlocking the encrypted iPhone of one of the San Bernardino shooters, Syed Rizwan Farook. In the motion, filed in the Federal District Court for the Central District of California, Apple argues that the All Writs Act does not give judges the authority “to compel innocent third parties Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – Feb. 21, 2016

Apple CEO Opposes Court Order to Help FBI Unlock San Berndaino Shooter’s iPhone On Tuesday, February 16, a federal judge in Los Angeles ordered Apple to provide “reasonable technical assistance” to investigators seeking to read the data on an iPhone 5C used by Rizwan Farook, who along with his wife, Tashfeen Malik, carried out the San Bernadino shootings. Such assistance would include disabling the phone’s auto-erase function, which automatically erases all of the phone’s data after Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – Feb. 6, 2016

Privacy Shield Data Transfer Agreement On February 2nd Officials from the United States and European Union agreed to a cross-Atlantic data transfer deal called Privacy Shield after three months of negotiations. The negotiations centered around disagreements between European and American regulators on the extent of privacy individuals should be able to expect for their data. The EU and US reached the agreement after the US government made promises that it would not target Europeans to Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – Jan. 29, 2016

Federal Marshals Raid Booth at the Consumer Electronics Show after Court Order On January 7 Federal Marshals shut down and seized the contents of a booth at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES). The seizure came after a Federal Judge granted Future Motion, Inc. a court order that included a Temporary Restraining Order and Seizure Order against the booth operator, Changzhou First.[1] Future Motion makes a one-wheeled hoverboard-like device called the Onewheel. It claims that Changzhou First Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – Dec. 11, 2015

LexisNexis Acquires Lex Machina, Legal Analytics Provider for IP Litigation At the end of November, legal research company LexisNexis announced its acquisition of legal analytics provider Lex Machina. Lex Machina, founded in California in 2010, provides legal analytics primarily as it relates to intellectual property (“IP”) litigation. Using its proprietary platform Legal Analytics®, the company mines IP litigation data to reveal information about judges, lawyers, parties, and patents. In-house counsel use this information to select outside counsel, and Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – Nov. 20, 2015

Law professors oppose federal trade secret act Forty-two law professors submitted a letter to Congress urging that the Defend Trade Secrets Act (DTSA) be rejected. The DTSA was introduced in July 2015 and would create a federal civil cause of action for misappropriation of trade secrets. With the exception of the Economic Espionage Act – which criminalizes theft of trade secrets – state law largely governs the area (typically through adoption of some version of Continue Reading →