STLR Link Roundup – November 22, 2013

‘Google Books’ Ruled Fair Use Judge Chin of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit held that the Google Books project was protected under fair use. Chin’s decision emphasized both the transformative nature of the project, as well as its significant social benefits. However, there have also been conflicting opinions about the decision with regards to the actual fair use analysis conducted by Judge Chin. The Authors Guild will appeal the S.D.N.Y. decision. Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – November 7, 2013

High-Tech, “Green” Cars Could Be the Next IP Battleground In the last five years, the number of patents filed per quarter increased from 20 to 90 by automobile manufacturers. These patents all relate to hybrid or electrical vehicle technologies. Automobile manufacturers are worried that the litigation war affecting the smartphone industry will spread to electric and hybrid vehicles. The automobile industry has been steadily expanding, and questions by potential consumers about battery reliability, driving range, Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – November 2, 2013

WTO Rules against China in Rare Mineral Earths Case Chinese government officials announced this Wednesday that the World Trade Organization has ruled against China’s export duties on rare earths. In doing so, the WTO dispute settlement panel basically upheld the joint claim by the United States, the European Union and Japan, questioning Beijing’s policy of limiting the amounts of rare earths it makes available to the international market as a violation of WTO rules. The Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – October 26, 2013

Will the Innovation Act Vanquish the Trolls? This Wednesday, Rep. Bob Goodlatte (R-VA) introduced the Innovation Act of 2013, a bill aimed at disempowering patent trolls. Notable provisions include a heightened pleading requirement for filing patent infringement claims, an assumption that attorneys’ fees will be awarded to prevailing parties, the delay of discovery until after a ruling on claim construction has been made, and transparency of ownership – that is, mandatory disclosure of the assignees Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – October 19, 2013

Quest Diagnostics releases BRCA gene test and preemptively sues Myriad Quest Diagnostics, Inc., one of the largest clinical laboratory companies worldwide, has released BRCAvantage, a diagnostic test for the cancer genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2.  The company initially announced its plans to introduce the tool this past June, immediately following the Supreme Court’s decision that isolated human genes are not patentable subject matter in Association for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics, Inc.   The Court, however, upheld Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – October 12, 2013

Apple Appeals E-Book Price-Fixing Ruling Apple formally appealed a July decision finding the company guilty of price-fixing in the electronic book (“e-book”) market, as well as an injunction prohibiting Apple from including “most-favored-nation” clauses in its e-book contracts for five years.  Last July, Apple was found guilty of “facilitate[ing] a conspiracy” with major book publishers to raise the price of e-books that cost consumers millions of dollars.  In 2007, Amazon released the Kindle e-reader, which quickly Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – October 5, 2013

The Silk Road Bust: Ulbricht, Tor and Bitcoins F.B.I. agents recently arrested Ross Ulbricht in connection to the Silk Road, a black market version of eBay that utilized bitcoin currency and was hosted on the Tor network. Since its origins in 2011, the Silk Road generated approximately $1.2 billion in revenue and $80 million in commissions and averaged up to 60,000 visitors per day. Bitcoin values initially dropped by about 20 percent but have swiftly Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – September 27, 2013

Senate Bills Would Limit NSA Surveillance A group of senators has introduced a bill that would limit the NSA’s surveillance powers. The Intelligence Oversight and Surveillance Reform Act, sponsored by Senators Ron Wyden (D, Oregon), Mark Udall (D, Colorado), Richard Blumenthal (D, Connecticut), and Rand Paul (R, Kentucky), would prohibit bulk data collection of cell phone records, close a loophole in the FISA Amendment Act that empowers the PRISM program to target domestic communications, and Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – September 7, 2013

Big Brother Isn’t the Only One Watching With all eyes on the federal government’s wiretapping activities, commercial interests have tapped into consumer devices with little to no repercussions. Corporate America – and apparently also Corporate Great Britain with approval from the British government – has been tracking consumer activities and movements without consumer permission or often without consumer knowledge. By tapping into consumers’ cell phones or other wireless devices, wireless network owners access a wealth Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – September 3, 2013

The Syrian Electronic Army Attacks On August 27, the Syrian Electronic Army (SEA), a group of hackers supportive of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, attacked several media organizations, including The New York Times, Huffington Post, and Twitter. Earlier in the month, the SEA had attacked the websites of The Washington Post and CNN. The attack continued to cause problems for the New York Times website through August 29. SEA also temporarily modified Twitter’s domain name server Continue Reading →