STLR Link Roundup – February 13, 2013

eShopping and the Constitution: How Far Does State Taxation Power Extend? Last week, Amazon and Overstock.com challenged a New York state law requiring the collection and payment of sales tax on all online transactions for which a New York-based entity “directly or indirectly refer[ed the] customers.” States have the authority to tax sales that occur within their borders. However, “virtual presence” has blurred state lines and created a valuable, tax-free e-commerce market. In the 1992 Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – February 6, 2013

Apple v. Samsung The intellectual property battle between Apple and Samsung continues. On January 29, the US federal court has refused Apple’s request to increase the $1 billion in damages. The court ruled that Samsung did not “willfully” violate Apple’s patents and refused to triple the damages that were owed by Samsung. Furthermore, the court has refused to impose a sales ban on Samsung Galaxy Nexus, which had been banned in June of 2012 and Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – October 22, 2012

3D Printing, Homemade Guns, and a Race for Control 3D printing is all the rage these days – as our own Darren Haber mused, the technology democratizes production while bringing up some interesting questions on the intellectual property front. Printers that used to cost hundreds of thousands of dollars now cost as little as $2,200 shipped. Benign 3D artists are attracting a following by creating open-source puzzles and guitars, while more aggressive thinkers are turning Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – February 3, 2012

In Washington, the House and the Senate backed competing spectrum incentive auction bills, which would encourage current licensees to sell their under-utilized frequencies at auction to wireless carriers.  Lawmakers in both chambers want to package it with the payroll tax extension, which is expected to pass before the end of February.  Former FCC Chairman Reed Hundt called the House legislation “the single worst telecom bill” he’d ever seen and Sen. John Kerry (D-Mass) called on Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – September 26, 2011

The FCC has filed its finalized net neutrality rules, set to take effect on November 20. The rules will almost certainly face legal challenges from Verizon and MetroPCS over the extent of the FCC’s jurisdiction. David Ignatius writes on legal uncertainty and difficult questions facing the future “rules of war” for drone strikes. The debate has gotten fresh attention over last week’s report that the Obama administration’s legal team is split on the extent of Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – September 6, 2011

The latest links from STLR: Last week, the Justice Department filed suit in DC District court to block AT&T’s $39 billion acquisition of T-Mobile, arguing that the merger violates antitrust laws. Sprint has since filed its own lawsuit in DC District court to block the proposed deal. The Senate debates the America Invents Act on Patent Reform (H.R.1249). These proposed reforms to the patent system are expected to be passed and signed by President Obama Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – August 2, 2010

The latest links from STLR: The Copyright Office released its latest group of exceptions to the Digital Millenium Copyright Act’s anti-circumvention provision. Wired and cnet news report on the exception for jailbreaking mobile phones. Also in DMCA news, Ars Technica discusses the Fifth Circuit decision that bypassing technological protections to access software for a fair use does not violate the DMCA anti-circumvention provision. The Supreme Court ruled on patentable subject matter in Bilski v. Kappos. Cnet, The Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – April 24, 2010

The latest on the STLR radar: Authorities in San Mateo, California, contemplate filing criminal charges in connection with the sale of an Apple prototype (of a new iPhone), lost by and possibly stolen from an Apple software engineer and bought for $5,000 by the website Gizmodo.com, the New York Times reports. From the San Francisco Chronicle: citing a desire to help fight censorship, Google has launched a tool that discloses requests the company receives from Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – April 16, 2010

The latest on the STLR radar: Ephemeral Law takes a look at the court documents in Microsoft’s challenge to the Waledac botnet, which it describes as on the “cutting edge of legal efforts to shut down hacking operations.” The Wall Street Journal reports that the US Department of Justice is stepping up its antitrust investigation into technology firms’ “no-poach” policy and salary fixing. Eric Goldman reports on a decision of the California Court of Appeals Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – April 9, 2010

The latest on the STLR radar: The British Parliament has approved a law authorizing temporary suspension of internet access for those accused of repeated copyright infringement, reports the New York Times. Opponents of the law, such as the Open Rights Group, promise to turn this into an election issue in Great Britain. Canadian company Wi-Lan has filed suit in the Eastern District of Texas against 19 high-tech companies—including heavyweights Apple, Dell, Motorola, Acer, and others—for Continue Reading →