Disney and RFID: What it Means for Privacy

Disney has always embraced cutting-edge technology, but in their theme parks, that technology tends to be behind the scenes. In the last decade, however, Disney’s Next Generation Experience, or “NextGen,” project has aimed to integrate technology overtly into the theme park experience by capitalizing on millennials’ use of smartphones to improve the park experience. Users with a smartphones can download the My Disney Experience app, which can be used to book dining reservations, access the Continue Reading →

Blockchain in the U.S. Regulatory Setting: Evidentiary Use in Vermont, Delaware, and Elsewhere

Joanna Diane Caytas* I. Introduction In February 2017, the Delaware Court of Chancery faced a conundrum: following settlement of a shareholder action after a contested merger, shareholders representing 49,164,415 shares claimed settlement proceeds, but the class contained only 36,793,758 shares.[1] By definition, holders of over 12 million of these shares must have lacked entitlement to settlement disbursements, yet all claimant shareholders presented valid evidence of ownership. Investigation by class attorneys failed to establish the “current” Continue Reading →

The Tensions of Antipsychotic Drugs with the Sixth Amendment

In Sell v. United States, the Supreme Court tackled the legal standard for determining when the government can administer antipsychotic drugs to a mentally ill criminal detainee without permission solely to render that defendant competent to stand trial.[1] In part, the court required that involuntary medication must be necessary to further important state interests and that administering the drugs is medically appropriate.[2] The Sell requirements were a response to the incredible risks that antipsychotics present Continue Reading →

Vault 7: The Concern Over Vulnerability Disclosure

On March 7, 2017, whistleblower website Wikileaks began releasing a series of classified Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) documents, now called the “Vault 7 Leaks.”[1] Some of these documents shed light on the CIA’s surveillance capabilities, including the ability to hack into electronic devices, like smartphones and televisions. For many, this brought back memories of Edward Snowden’s release of National Security Agency (NSA) documents, which exposed the NSA’s mass collection of metadata from phone conversations around Continue Reading →

Posting without Hosting: Implications of Russia’s Recent Removal of LinkedIn

If you had hoped to check out your career prospects on LinkedIn from Russia this past week, you might have been puzzled by the site’s failure to load. LinkedIn has been blocked following the Court of Appeal’s (for Moscow’s Taginsky District) recent decision that LinkedIn violates a Russian data protection law, Federal Law No. 242-FZ (“No. 242”), on two counts: not storing data about Russians on servers located in Russian territory; and processing information about Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – November 18, 2016

Following Election, Facebook Faces Fake News Problem Following the conclusion of last week’s election, Facebook has faced significant media backlash regarding its role in facilitating the propagation of false information leading up to the election. What initially started as an internal conversation amongst senior executives of the firm quickly spread to various news outlets. The media outcry prompted an immediate response from Mark Zuckerberg, in which he claimed: “of all the content on Facebook, more Continue Reading →

Airbnb – For the People, Not the Powerful

In response to New York Governor Andrew Cuomo signing into law the toughest regulation to date against Airbnb, Josh Meltzer, head of Airbnb’s New York public policy, stated “We will continue to fight for a smart policy solution that works for the people, not the powerful” (Emphasis added). The law seeks to limit the affect short-term Airbnb rentals have on NYC’s hotel industry and high rent prices. To be clear, Airbnb plays offense, not defense, in Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – October 14, 2016

Video Game Gambling Faces Regulatory Scrutiny Last week, the Washington State Gambling Commission sent a letter to Bellevue, Washington-based Valve Corporation, the owner and operator of the Steam PC-gaming platform, demanding it provide evidence by Oct. 14 that it isn’t facilitating illegal gambling via online video gaming. Failure to comply could result in civil or criminal charges against Valve employees, according to the letter. In the case of Valve’s “Counter-Strike,” decorative “skins” are being wagered like Continue Reading →

Seeking Comments for Upcoming Issue

Earlier this month, the Metropolitan Museum of Art hosted the long-awaited Met Gala, titled  “Manus x Machina: Fashion in an Age of Technology.” As celebrities walked the red carpet in couture gowns turned wearable tech, this year’s theme reflected the expanding nexus of technology and the fashion industry. In a time when technology occupies an undeniable role in our lives as consumers, attorneys, and academics, Columbia Science and Technology Law Review is thrilled to publish Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup — March 11th, 2016

Google uses Geolocation to Implement Right to Be Forgotten Ruling Google will use IP address data and other geolocation signals to determine whether a Google Search user is located in Europe. If so, Google will delist search results covered by the European Court of Justice’s “Right to be Forgotten” rulings. Peter Fleischer, Global Privacy Counsel at Google, released a blog post on a company blog on March 4th, detailing some specifics of the implementation. Previously, Continue Reading →