STLR Link Roundup – Nov. 1, 2015

Supreme Court to revisit patent damage The Supreme Court announced that they intend to consider the issue of “enhance damages” in patent cases, a process allowing for treble damages in face of deliberate patent infringement. ( One issue addresses whether the Federal Circuit erred in applying a two-part test pursuant to 35 U.S.C. §284 to enhanced patent infringement damages. A second focuses on a district court’s right to discretion under 35 U.S.C. § 284 to Continue Reading →

STLR Link Round Up – October 19, 2015

WARF v. Apple Last Friday, a jury in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Wisconsin ordered Apple to pay the Wisconsin Alumni Research foundation (WARF) $ 234 million in damages for patent infringement. The dispute is about a single patent US 5,781,752 under the name “Table based data speculation circuit for parallel processing computer” which covers technology that “improves the efficiency and performance of contemporary computer processors.”  The ‘752 technology appears in Continue Reading →

STLR Link Round Up – October 9, 2015

EU Court of Justice Invalidates US Safe Harbor Data Agreement In a sweeping decision, the European Union’s highest court declared a Safe Harbor agreement between the European Union and the United States invalid in the case of Maximillian Schrems v Data Protection Commissioner. Using documents leaked by Edward Snowden in 2013 to prove his case, Austrian citizen Maximillian Schrems utilized his status as a Facebook user to argue successfully that the law and practices of Continue Reading →

Are 3D Printed Tissues and Organs Patentable?

It has been long established, and recently codified in the Leahy-Smith America Invents Act (AIA), that no one is able to obtain a patent on any part of the human body. Examiners are taught to issue 35 U.S.C. 101 and AIA § 33(a) rejections even if claims are directed towards devices that are “attached to” parts of the human body and recommend applicants change the language to “configured to be attached” or something similar so Continue Reading →

Your (non)public data is showing.

Background Insider trading, though the iconic vision of Wall Street fraud and the subject of many dramatic trials and movies, is not expressly proscribed by any law or regulation in the United States. “Section 10(b) of the 1934 Act, 15 U.S.C. § 78j(b), prohibits the use ‘in connection with the purchase or sale of any security . . . [of] any manipulative or deceptive device or contrivance in contravention of such rules and regulations as Continue Reading →

STLR Link Round-Up – Feb. 27, 2015

Internet Freedom Provided in Historic Net Neutrality Vote  The Federal Communications Commission voted to approve net neutrality rules despite significant opposition from cable companies and Republicans. The historic vote ensures that Internet content consumers wish to access will be treated equally by Internet service providers, regardless of content. On-demand Internet streaming provider, Netflix, hailed the net neutrality vote as a win for consumers, which will help further regulate wired and wireless Internet access more like Continue Reading →

STLR Link Round-Up – Feb. 20, 2015

High Profile Vulnerabilities Continue to Make Headlines Lenovo users found out that new laptops had come preinstalled with malicious code, known as Superfish. The code is hidden deep within Windows and is very difficult to find, raising the question of how it got there in the first place. Lenovo is providing a removal tool to its users. (CNET) Kaspersky Lab, a Russian computer security firm alleged that groups linked to the U.S. Government had embedded spyware Continue Reading →

The Legal Response to Revenge Porn

It is not uncommon for couples to break up on less than stellar terms. There is quite a difference, however, between deleting an ex’s phone number and posting nude pictures or videos of him or her on the Internet in order to cause embarrassment or fallout with friends and family. This phenomenon, known as revenge porn, has increasingly received attention from the nation’s lawmakers and pro bono attorneys. This attention culminated in October of 2013, Continue Reading →

Snowden Revelations Inspire Greater Transparency in Technology Companies

Edward Snowden’s leaked documents first surfaced in The Guardian and The Washington Post in June 2013, exposing National Security Agency (NSA) efforts to gather the telephone records and digital data of millions of Americans. Through its PRISM program, the NSA was able to directly collect information from the internet servers of companies like Microsoft and Yahoo. The NSA was also able to engage in bulk collection of user data through targeted data collection protected by Continue Reading →

Undergoing Major Renovation (some links will be temporarily broken)

Hello, As you can see, we have changed the appearance of our site. This change is a component of a major migration to a new server, an up-to-date version of wordpress, among other internal improvements. All of the content from the old version of the site has been migrated. However, for the next few days, a few links (including the perma-links) will be broken as we comb through the site to adjust to the new file organization Continue Reading →