STLR Link Roundup – November 18, 2016

Following Election, Facebook Faces Fake News Problem Following the conclusion of last week’s election, Facebook has faced significant media backlash regarding its role in facilitating the propagation of false information leading up to the election. What initially started as an internal conversation amongst senior executives of the firm quickly spread to various news outlets. The media outcry prompted an immediate response from Mark Zuckerberg, in which he claimed: “of all the content on Facebook, more Continue Reading →

Airbnb – For the People, Not the Powerful

In response to New York Governor Andrew Cuomo signing into law the toughest regulation to date against Airbnb, Josh Meltzer, head of Airbnb’s New York public policy, stated “We will continue to fight for a smart policy solution that works for the people, not the powerful” (Emphasis added). The law seeks to limit the affect short-term Airbnb rentals have on NYC’s hotel industry and high rent prices. To be clear, Airbnb plays offense, not defense, in Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – October 14, 2016

Video Game Gambling Faces Regulatory Scrutiny Last week, the Washington State Gambling Commission sent a letter to Bellevue, Washington-based Valve Corporation, the owner and operator of the Steam PC-gaming platform, demanding it provide evidence by Oct. 14 that it isn’t facilitating illegal gambling via online video gaming. Failure to comply could result in civil or criminal charges against Valve employees, according to the letter. In the case of Valve’s “Counter-Strike,” decorative “skins” are being wagered like Continue Reading →

Seeking Comments for Upcoming Issue

Earlier this month, the Metropolitan Museum of Art hosted the long-awaited Met Gala, titled  “Manus x Machina: Fashion in an Age of Technology.” As celebrities walked the red carpet in couture gowns turned wearable tech, this year’s theme reflected the expanding nexus of technology and the fashion industry. In a time when technology occupies an undeniable role in our lives as consumers, attorneys, and academics, Columbia Science and Technology Law Review is thrilled to publish Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup — March 11th, 2016

Google uses Geolocation to Implement Right to Be Forgotten Ruling Google will use IP address data and other geolocation signals to determine whether a Google Search user is located in Europe. If so, Google will delist search results covered by the European Court of Justice’s “Right to be Forgotten” rulings. Peter Fleischer, Global Privacy Counsel at Google, released a blog post on a company blog on March 4th, detailing some specifics of the implementation. Previously, Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – Feb. 6, 2016

Privacy Shield Data Transfer Agreement On February 2nd Officials from the United States and European Union agreed to a cross-Atlantic data transfer deal called Privacy Shield after three months of negotiations. The negotiations centered around disagreements between European and American regulators on the extent of privacy individuals should be able to expect for their data. The EU and US reached the agreement after the US government made promises that it would not target Europeans to Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – Nov. 1, 2015

Supreme Court to revisit patent damage The Supreme Court announced that they intend to consider the issue of “enhance damages” in patent cases, a process allowing for treble damages in face of deliberate patent infringement. (http://www.scotusblog.com/case-files/cases/halo-electronics-inc-v-pulse-electronics-inc/) One issue addresses whether the Federal Circuit erred in applying a two-part test pursuant to 35 U.S.C. §284 to enhanced patent infringement damages. A second focuses on a district court’s right to discretion under 35 U.S.C. § 284 to Continue Reading →

STLR Link Round Up – October 19, 2015

WARF v. Apple Last Friday, a jury in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Wisconsin ordered Apple to pay the Wisconsin Alumni Research foundation (WARF) $ 234 million in damages for patent infringement. The dispute is about a single patent US 5,781,752 under the name “Table based data speculation circuit for parallel processing computer” which covers technology that “improves the efficiency and performance of contemporary computer processors.”  The ‘752 technology appears in Continue Reading →

STLR Link Round Up – October 9, 2015

EU Court of Justice Invalidates US Safe Harbor Data Agreement In a sweeping decision, the European Union’s highest court declared a Safe Harbor agreement between the European Union and the United States invalid in the case of Maximillian Schrems v Data Protection Commissioner. Using documents leaked by Edward Snowden in 2013 to prove his case, Austrian citizen Maximillian Schrems utilized his status as a Facebook user to argue successfully that the law and practices of Continue Reading →

Are 3D Printed Tissues and Organs Patentable?

It has been long established, and recently codified in the Leahy-Smith America Invents Act (AIA), that no one is able to obtain a patent on any part of the human body. Examiners are taught to issue 35 U.S.C. 101 and AIA § 33(a) rejections even if claims are directed towards devices that are “attached to” parts of the human body and recommend applicants change the language to “configured to be attached” or something similar so Continue Reading →