Exclusive Rights in Vague Terms – Vantablack in the Arts

Background In the summer of 2014, British company Surrey NanoSystems (“SNS”) announced that it had created a new substance out of carbon nanotubes that would absorb up to 99.96% of light.[1] It is created by growing nanotubes on a surface heated to over 430 degrees Celsius, and is currently only produced by SNS. Intended for military and scientific use, Vantablack could increase stealth capacity and significantly decrease reflective interference in telescopes.   Exclusive License and Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – February 17, 2017

Oracle and Google, to be continued… The legal saga between Oracle and Google is stretching into the seventh year. The show started when Oracle stated that Google infringed its copyright by “borrowing” programming codes in building of its Android software platform. Last summer, a jury ruled in Google’s favor and stated that the use of Java API by Google falls under fair use policy. But Oracle promised that this wasn’t the end of the story. And Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – February 3, 2017

Uber Comes to a Standstill in Taiwan Following protests from local taxi drivers in Taiwan and orders by the government to pay millions in back taxes and fines, Uber Technologies Inc. said on February 2, 2017 its services have reached a standstill in Taiwan due to the escalating dispute with the government over the legality of its operations. On the same day, Taiwan’s Investment Commission stated the government requested the suspension of Uber’s business because, though Uber registered Continue Reading →

Link Roundup 2/11/17

NYSE: SNAP Snap Inc., best known for Snapchat, its overshare-facilitating mobile app, is going public. If current investor optimism holds, it could prove to be the most expensive tech IPO ever: its current valuation is $25,000,000,000. Skeptics are quick to note that Snap Inc. has never made a profit—it actually lost half a billion last year. Snap is also facing allegations of corporate sexism, being easily distracted by “toys,” and having a confusing interface. Nevertheless, Continue Reading →

Digital Afterlife and How to Tweet Post Mortem

Carrie Fisher passed away on December 27, 2016, at the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles, after suffering a massive heart attack. Fisher, a famous actress best known for her role as Princess Leia in the Star Wars franchise, maintained a number of quite active social media accounts, primarily a twitter account with 1.25 million followers and a Facebook account with 523,845 Likes. Since her passing, no activity has been registered on these Continue Reading →

The FCC’s Latest Privacy Regulations: A New Stance on Private-Sector Protections?

Editor’s Note: This post was written by guest contributor Ido Sivan Sevilla, a Ph.D Candidate in Public Policy & Information Security at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. Mr. Sevilla earned his Master’s degree in Public Policy Analysis as a Fulbright Scholar at the University of Minnesota – Twin Cities, and served as a Legislative Fellow for Congressman Ami Bera of California’s 7th Congressional District. Mr. Sevilla’s research focuses on cyber security in national defense and the public sector. Continue Reading →

Supreme Court Upholds Patent Office’s Method Of Claim Construction

The 2011 Leahy-Smith America Invents Act (“AIA”) created a procedure called inter partes review (“IPR”) at the United States Patent Office (“PTO”) that allowed third parties to petition the PTO to reexamine previously issued patents to re-evaluate their patentability in light of prior art.1 The Act also granted the PTO the authority to issue “regulations . . . establishing and governing inter partes review.”2 Accordingly, the PTO issued a regulation stipulating that during IPR, a Continue Reading →

Posting without Hosting: Implications of Russia’s Recent Removal of LinkedIn

If you had hoped to check out your career prospects on LinkedIn from Russia this past week, you might have been puzzled by the site’s failure to load. LinkedIn has been blocked following the Court of Appeal’s (for Moscow’s Taginsky District) recent decision that LinkedIn violates a Russian data protection law, Federal Law No. 242-FZ (“No. 242”), on two counts: not storing data about Russians on servers located in Russian territory; and processing information about Continue Reading →

Link Round-Up: 25th November, 2016

Happy Thanksgiving to all readers! Concerns Over Cybersecurity Hacking and cybersecurity have been high profile issues of late but especially this week, with a report that Hilary Clinton’s electoral defeat may have been the work of hackers. Deeper analyses of these claims suggest otherwise, however. Unfortunately, not all cybersecurity concerns are groundless: the U.S. Navy has confirmed that hackers gained access to sensitive personal information, including Social Security numbers, of over 130 thousand current and Continue Reading →

The IPTV Transition: How will regulators and customers react to the impending changes?

Internet Protocol Television (IPTV) is a relatively new technology that promises to revolutionize the Television marketplace. Services like AT&T U-verse and Verizon FIOS promise to deliver television and Internet services to customers with increased access to Video-on-Demand (VOD) and increased Internet bandwidth. Unlike the recent digital TV transition initiated by the FCC and subject to several administrative orders and long-term delays,[i] transition to IPTV will be triggered by market factors. Most notably, customers’ preferences for Continue Reading →