STLR Link Round-up – 2/10/2018

Settlement Reached in Waymo v. Uber Almost a year after Waymo (the self-driving car unit spun off by Google) filed a lawsuit against Uber, the two sides reached a settlement in which Uber agreed to give $245 million in shares—.34 percent of its equity at the company’s $72 billion valuation—and the case would be dismissed with prejudice. Waymo had originally demanded at least $1 billion in damages and a public apology as conditions for settling Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – February 2, 2018

Artificial Intelligence Case Briefing Software to Assist Litigators in Writing Briefs Just before the start of Legalweek New York excitement erupted when ROSS Intelligence CEO Andrew Arruda hyped the announcement of ROSS’s new product EVA. EVA uses artificial intelligence to assist litigators in writing briefs by streamlining the process of case law research by finding details relevant to new cases. The goal is to make case research, citations, and studies as easy as possible. Currently, Continue Reading →

Enforceability of Smart Contracts under the Statute of Frauds

What is a Blockchain: Blockchains are digital ledgers maintained by a network of computers. Anybody with internet access can set up an account to use a blockchain. The account is comprised of a public and private key. The public key can be analogized to an email account where the private key is like the password. Using the account allows to owner to send and receive tokens (such as bitcoin) and other information. All the transactions Continue Reading →

STLR Link Round-up – Jan 26, 2018

Qualcomm: the Latest Victim of the Harsh Antitrust Enforcement by EU In a recent move, the EU competition regulator fined Qualcomm €997m (US$ 1.2bn) for anti-competitive practices. Qualcomm was deemed to be abusing its dominant market position in the LTE baseband chipsets market by making exclusivity arrangements with device manufacturer Apple – arrangements that essentially would see Apple use only Qualcomm chips for their smartphones and tablet devices. As the European Commission noted, “Qualcomm prevented Continue Reading →

Does fMRI Lie Detection Have a Future in the Courtroom?

Background Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) is a brain imagining technique developed in the 1990’s based on blood oxygenation levels in the brain. The underlying property upon which fMRI relies is hemoglobin’s tendency to exhibit different magnetic properties when oxygenated than when deoxygenated. By inducing a strong magnetic field on the subject and observing how the hemoglobin responds to the field, neurologists can determine which parts of the brain are experiencing greater blood flow during Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – December 2, 2017

Supreme Court Oral Arguments on Constitutionality of Inter Partes Review Last Monday, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in Oil States Energy Services LLC v. Greene’s Energy Group, LLC, No. 16-712, to decide the issue on the constitutionality of the inter partes review (IPR) procedure created by the Leahy-Smith America Invents Act of 2011. IPR is an adversarial process that allows the Patent Trial and Appeal Board to reconsider the validity of issued patents on Continue Reading →

Changing Privacy Laws in the Digital Age: Carpenter v. United States

In an age of ever-increasing reliance on digital technology, concerns about security and privacy have become increasingly relevant. When such technology has been used by individuals to coordinate and orchestrate criminal acts, courts been faced with the challenge of balancing these individuals’ privacy rights with law enforcement’s investigative goals. For example, in 2014, the United States Supreme Court held that the warrantless search of a cell phone obtained during an arrest was unconstitutional.  On the Continue Reading →

Automated Notices for Copyright Infringement: Pitfalls and Remedies

Background of Notice and Takedown Since the birth of the internet, online service providers (OSPs) have butted heads with copyright holders over whether OSPs should be responsible for copyright-infringing material posted by their users. Should Google be liable for infringement when it provides links to websites that post photographs without a copyright license?[1] Should YouTube owe damages for hosting a video that plays a song or shows a clip from a movie protected by copyright?[2] Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – November 25, 2017

Diverging Perspectives on Artificial Intelligence Carlos Moedas, the EU Research Commissioner, recently gave a speech in which he censured the overwhelming pessimism of contemporary artificial intelligence scholarship. He warned that sensational headlines warning of apocalyptic scenarios resulting from the development of super-intelligent machines are likely to stoke fears that could impede the adoption of new beneficial technologies. Many prominent figures in the technology community have begun making public comments warning of the cataclysmic potential of Continue Reading →