Is the iPad’s Exclusion of Flash Unlawful?

Last month, Steve Jobs introduced the iPad to an eager crowd of Apple faithful, promising it would be magical and revolutionary.   Minutes into the presentation, Jobs browsed to a New York Times article only to find that in place of a large central image was a blank space with a small blue cube.   Some audience members seemed to laugh out loud at this all-too-familiar sight, realizing that the iPad, like the iPhone, lacked Flash capabilities. Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – January 29, 2010

The latest on the STLR radar: Ephemerallaw assess the chances of Microsoft being sued for the Internet Explorer 6 vulnerability involved in the hacks recently suffered by Google, Adobe and other major companies. Billboard.biz reports that search engine Baidu, Google’s arch-rival in China, has won a piracy case brought by the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry for linking to illegal music downloads. As Apple launches its latest handheld device, Erblawg reports on Apple’s battle Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – January 1, 2010

Happy New Year!  We bring you the last links from the second half of December 2009 on the first day of 2010. Clever or illegal?  How online retailer Amazon escapes paying sales tax (and saves you from it as well), from Gizmodo. South Korea pardons former chairman of Samsung… a second time.  From the Wall Street Journal. Your text messages just got a little safer: The Times reports the Ohio Supreme Court has decided a Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – December 18, 2009

The latest on the STLR radar: The New York Times discusses the increasingly complex battle over e-book publishing rights. True/Slant reports on Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s glitch with his social network’s new privacy settings, and asks whether the changes might violate FTC regulations. Misbehaving in the jury box: jurors researching on Wikipedia led to an overturned murder conviction, and jurors friending each other on Facebook is the subject of mistrial challenge, reports the ABA Journal. Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – December 11, 2009

The latest on the STLR radar: Judges and Facebook – Is it ok to be FB friends with lawyers?  The Florida Judicial Ethics Advisory Committee says no, reports the New York Times. Michael Arrington and Crunchpad sues JooJoo for the joint tablet venture that so publicly went wrong, says Gizmodo. The Environmental Protection Agency announces that greenhouse gases pose a danger to human health and environment.  New federal and possibly international regulation are expected to Continue Reading →

Psystar Is Swatted Down In Court In Suit Against Apple

Those in the market for a so-called “Hackintosh,” a non-Apple computer which runs Apple’s Mac OS X, will soon be out of luck, as commercial Mac clone dealer, Psystar, was recently dealt a major setback in the United States District Court for the Northern District of California.  On November 13th, the court granted Apple Inc.’s summary judgment motion on its copyright and DMCA claims against Psystar, all but foreclosing the possibility of buying a non-Apple-made Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – November 20, 2009

The latest on the STLR radar: Google announces that Google Scholar will now search “full text legal opinions from U.S. federal and state district, appellate and supreme courts” as well as legal journal articles. Columbia Law School’s own Tim Wu is one of several acknowledged parties in the announcement, for his work on AltLaw. Competition among flat-panel TV makers to produce more energy-efficient TVs is no longer just a marketing issue in California – it’s Continue Reading →