STLR Link Roundup – October 5, 2011

Privacy rights advocates filed a letter with the FTC, asking the commission to investigate Facebook’s user tracking after log off and whether Facebook’s new Ticker and Timeline feature constitute unfair or deceptive business practices.   The United States signs the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement this Saturday, an accord targeting intellectual property piracy. Some academics argue, however, that ACTA requires Congressional approval. T-Mobile files amicus brief in the Northern California District Court, supporting Samsung in a patent dispute Continue Reading →

Vernor v. Autodesk and the End of the First Sale Doctrine

The 9th Circuit’s Vernor v. Autodesk test demolishes the first sale doctrine by making its application contingent solely on the licensing agreement written by the copyright holder. Though the Vernor case centers on the distribution of software, there is no limiting principle that prevents the Vernor test from being applied broadly to all copyrighted works. Thus, the Vernor test, if upheld, it could mean the end of all markets for used copyrighted works. The First Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – April 24, 2010

The latest on the STLR radar: Authorities in San Mateo, California, contemplate filing criminal charges in connection with the sale of an Apple prototype (of a new iPhone), lost by and possibly stolen from an Apple software engineer and bought for $5,000 by the website Gizmodo.com, the New York Times reports. From the San Francisco Chronicle: citing a desire to help fight censorship, Google has launched a tool that discloses requests the company receives from Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – December 18, 2009

The latest on the STLR radar: The New York Times discusses the increasingly complex battle over e-book publishing rights. True/Slant reports on Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s glitch with his social network’s new privacy settings, and asks whether the changes might violate FTC regulations. Misbehaving in the jury box: jurors researching on Wikipedia led to an overturned murder conviction, and jurors friending each other on Facebook is the subject of mistrial challenge, reports the ABA Journal. Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – December 11, 2009

The latest on the STLR radar: Judges and Facebook – Is it ok to be FB friends with lawyers?  The Florida Judicial Ethics Advisory Committee says no, reports the New York Times. Michael Arrington and Crunchpad sues JooJoo for the joint tablet venture that so publicly went wrong, says Gizmodo. The Environmental Protection Agency announces that greenhouse gases pose a danger to human health and environment.  New federal and possibly international regulation are expected to Continue Reading →

John McCain and the Music Makers

Senator John McCain’s presidential campaign recently raised the hackles of a number of prominent recording artists for using their music in TV ads and at rallies.1 The all-star lineup of affronted artists included Van Halen (for use of “Right Now;” they also objected to George W. Bush’s use in 2004), Foo Fighters (for use of “My Hero” at rallies),John Mellencamp (for use of “Pink Houses”), Jackson Browne (for use of “Running on Empty” by the Continue Reading →