STLR Link Roundup – August 2, 2010

The latest links from STLR: The Copyright Office released its latest group of exceptions to the Digital Millenium Copyright Act’s anti-circumvention provision. Wired and cnet news report on the exception for jailbreaking mobile phones. Also in DMCA news, Ars Technica discusses the Fifth Circuit decision that bypassing technological protections to access software for a fair use does not violate the DMCA anti-circumvention provision. The Supreme Court ruled on patentable subject matter in Bilski v. Kappos. Cnet, The Continue Reading →

Mom Makes Progress in Suing Universal For Taking Down Her YouTube Video

On February 8, 2007, Stephanie Lenz uploaded a 29-second home movie of her son walking around her kitchen and dancing to YouTube.  Her son is bopping along to the beat of Prince’s “Let’s Get Crazy.” Unlike some YouTube videos, this music was not added after through an editing process – it is merely the song that was on in the background in her house and the time and therefore was recorded on the video. Despite Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – March 5, 2010

The latest on the STLR radar: Out-Law reports on a US District Court for the Northern District of California case that clarifies how damages for groundless claims of copyright infringement should be determined. Apple is suing HTC over infringement of its user interface patents, but it’s really Google it’s after, says IP Watchdog. RealNetworks drops its appeal against a ruling declaring that its DVD-copying software violated the DMCA – Wired reports. Is it the car Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – February 12, 2010

The latest on the STLR radar: Wired reports on Max Ray Vision’s thirteen-year sentence for hacking – the longest yet in U.S. legal history. The District Court for the Western District of Washington dismisses a lawsuit alleging that Microsoft misled its customers by representing anti-piracy code as a critical security update. ComputerWorld reports. The E-Commerce Times looks into codec licensing issues and what it means for the development of the next generation of HTML. The Register Continue Reading →

John McCain and the Music Makers

Senator John McCain’s presidential campaign recently raised the hackles of a number of prominent recording artists for using their music in TV ads and at rallies.1 The all-star lineup of affronted artists included Van Halen (for use of “Right Now;” they also objected to George W. Bush’s use in 2004), Foo Fighters (for use of “My Hero” at rallies),John Mellencamp (for use of “Pink Houses”), Jackson Browne (for use of “Running on Empty” by the Continue Reading →