STLR Link Roundup – October 5, 2011

Privacy rights advocates filed a letter with the FTC, asking the commission to investigate Facebook’s user tracking after log off and whether Facebook’s new Ticker and Timeline feature constitute unfair or deceptive business practices.   The United States signs the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement this Saturday, an accord targeting intellectual property piracy. Some academics argue, however, that ACTA requires Congressional approval. T-Mobile files amicus brief in the Northern California District Court, supporting Samsung in a patent dispute Continue Reading →

The Right to Be Forgotten?

Have you ever Googled your own name? Statistics say that you probably have. Egotism aside, in a world where potential employers, schools and even romantic partners are likely to Google you, it would be irresponsible not to be aware of what pops up when you search your name. Many experts (and this non-expert) even recommend setting up a Google alert in your name. But, what can one really do if, for example, your top search Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – April 9, 2010

The latest on the STLR radar: The British Parliament has approved a law authorizing temporary suspension of internet access for those accused of repeated copyright infringement, reports the New York Times. Opponents of the law, such as the Open Rights Group, promise to turn this into an election issue in Great Britain. Canadian company Wi-Lan has filed suit in the Eastern District of Texas against 19 high-tech companies—including heavyweights Apple, Dell, Motorola, Acer, and others—for Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – February 27, 2010

A federal appeals court held that federal agents need not get warrants to search files shared over peer-to-peer networks, reports Wired. The Pentagon will now allow troops access to online social media like Twitter, YouTube, and MySpace, Business Weekly reports. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has given Google a license to trade energy on the wholesale market, as The Register reports. Notifications of website privacy policies do not appear to actually protect online privacy, the Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – January 29, 2010

The latest on the STLR radar: Ephemerallaw assess the chances of Microsoft being sued for the Internet Explorer 6 vulnerability involved in the hacks recently suffered by Google, Adobe and other major companies. Billboard.biz reports that search engine Baidu, Google’s arch-rival in China, has won a piracy case brought by the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry for linking to illegal music downloads. As Apple launches its latest handheld device, Erblawg reports on Apple’s battle Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – January 1, 2010

Happy New Year!  We bring you the last links from the second half of December 2009 on the first day of 2010. Clever or illegal?  How online retailer Amazon escapes paying sales tax (and saves you from it as well), from Gizmodo. South Korea pardons former chairman of Samsung… a second time.  From the Wall Street Journal. Your text messages just got a little safer: The Times reports the Ohio Supreme Court has decided a Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – December 18, 2009

The latest on the STLR radar: The New York Times discusses the increasingly complex battle over e-book publishing rights. True/Slant reports on Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s glitch with his social network’s new privacy settings, and asks whether the changes might violate FTC regulations. Misbehaving in the jury box: jurors researching on Wikipedia led to an overturned murder conviction, and jurors friending each other on Facebook is the subject of mistrial challenge, reports the ABA Journal. Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – December 11, 2009

The latest on the STLR radar: Judges and Facebook – Is it ok to be FB friends with lawyers?  The Florida Judicial Ethics Advisory Committee says no, reports the New York Times. Michael Arrington and Crunchpad sues JooJoo for the joint tablet venture that so publicly went wrong, says Gizmodo. The Environmental Protection Agency announces that greenhouse gases pose a danger to human health and environment.  New federal and possibly international regulation are expected to Continue Reading →