The Law and Politics of Net Neutrality: Part 2

In the previous post, I wrote about the recent history of net neutrality, the Open Internet Rules in the works, and the ensuing backroom dealings and legislative battles.  But now that the mid-term elections are over, has the future of net neutrality rules changed, and is net neutrality dead? Republicans made gains in the Senate and took control of the House, but does the change in legislative politics impact the regulatory process (and the profit Continue Reading →

The Law and Politics of Net Neutrality: Part 1

The current political climate portends significant political changes following today’s midterm elections.  The balance of power will likely shift back toward the right, greatly reducing the governing mandate of the Democratic Party.  The current administration’s ability to push policies through will be tempered by a shift of power in Congress, possibly preventing the Obama administration from achieving its stated policy goals after two years in power.  One of the policy goals under attack is Net Continue Reading →

A Legal Setback for Net Neutrality Advocates

On Tuesday April 6th, a three-judge panel from the federal appeals bench ruled that the Federal Communications Commission has no authority to place “net neutrality” requirements on Internet Service Providers (ISPs). The unanimous ruling overturned the FCC’s August 2008 order for Comcast to cease slowing BitTorrent transfers. Comcast later voluntarily changed its own policy and agreed to treat BitTorrent traffic no differently from other traffic. However, the issue of the FCC’s legal authority still remained, Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – March 12, 2010

The latest on the STLR radar: The New York Times explains that television providers, including TimeWarner and Verizon, are petitioning the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to change TV retransmission rules so that stations (like ABC or CBS) have less leverage over TV providers. The FCC is also asking people to test their broadband speeds at its website, Wired reports, to evaluate whether American telecommunications companies are keeping their promises about broadband speed and accessibility. Business Continue Reading →

Is the iPad’s Exclusion of Flash Unlawful?

Last month, Steve Jobs introduced the iPad to an eager crowd of Apple faithful, promising it would be magical and revolutionary.   Minutes into the presentation, Jobs browsed to a New York Times article only to find that in place of a large central image was a blank space with a small blue cube.   Some audience members seemed to laugh out loud at this all-too-familiar sight, realizing that the iPad, like the iPhone, lacked Flash capabilities. Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – January 1, 2010

Happy New Year!  We bring you the last links from the second half of December 2009 on the first day of 2010. Clever or illegal?  How online retailer Amazon escapes paying sales tax (and saves you from it as well), from Gizmodo. South Korea pardons former chairman of Samsung… a second time.  From the Wall Street Journal. Your text messages just got a little safer: The Times reports the Ohio Supreme Court has decided a Continue Reading →