U.S. Senate Subcommittee Examines American Companies’ Compliance With Censorship Abroad

Ever since Google’s recent announcement that it would no longer comply with China’s requirements for censored search results, U.S. companies doing business in China have come under increased scrutiny from human rights groups and American lawmakers, the New York Times reports. This scrutiny is directed at the companies’ compliance with internet censorship demands from the Chinese and other governments. Among the companies targeted for criticism are Google, Amazon, McAfee, Yahoo, eBay, Microsoft, Apple and Verizon. Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – February 19, 2010

The latest on the STLR radar: As it launches its cloud computing platform, Azure, Microsoft calls for federal regulation to clarify many of the open legal questions surrounding cloud computing, says the MTTLR Blog. Ten years after it applies, TiVo is granted patent for season pass subscriptions, writes Gizmodo (see our recent post on TiVo’s patent battle with Microsoft here). INFO/LAW recommends a Paul Ohm paper arguing that statistical techniques are eroding the effectiveness of Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – February 12, 2010

The latest on the STLR radar: Wired reports on Max Ray Vision’s thirteen-year sentence for hacking – the longest yet in U.S. legal history. The District Court for the Western District of Washington dismisses a lawsuit alleging that Microsoft misled its customers by representing anti-piracy code as a critical security update. ComputerWorld reports. The E-Commerce Times looks into codec licensing issues and what it means for the development of the next generation of HTML. The Register Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – February 5, 2010

This week on the STLR radar: Freedom to Tinker conducts a “census” of files shared through BitTorrent, finding 99% of them to infringe copyright. From Business Week: a Pittsburgh couple is suing Google for trespass because Google posted pictures of their residence, including their pool and driveway. Italy will hold YouTube liable for uploads that infringe copyright or are libelous, Ars Technica reports, which would eliminate “safe harbor” rules that protect websites with user-generated content Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – January 29, 2010

The latest on the STLR radar: Ephemerallaw assess the chances of Microsoft being sued for the Internet Explorer 6 vulnerability involved in the hacks recently suffered by Google, Adobe and other major companies. Billboard.biz reports that search engine Baidu, Google’s arch-rival in China, has won a piracy case brought by the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry for linking to illegal music downloads. As Apple launches its latest handheld device, Erblawg reports on Apple’s battle Continue Reading →

Could the WTO bring down the Great Firewall of China?

Google’s recent announcement that it is no longer willing to censor content on its China-based search engine, google.cn, has once again highlighted the difficulties U.S.-based online service providers face in the Chinese market. The reason given by Google for the move was a “highly sophisticated and targeted attack on [its] corporate infrastructure originating from China,” which was apparently aimed at accessing the gmail accounts of Chinese human rights activists. Though this has little to do Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – January 22, 2010

The latest on the STLR radar: More on Google and China: U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton condemned countries that use cyberattacks, reports the New York Times. Meanwhile, from the Wall Street Journal, Google affirmed its commitment both to remaining in China and to ceasing censorship of its search results. The company Legal River has released online Terms of Service and Privacy Policy Generators for entrepreneurs and small businesses to use to minimize legal costs, Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – January 1, 2010

Happy New Year!  We bring you the last links from the second half of December 2009 on the first day of 2010. Clever or illegal?  How online retailer Amazon escapes paying sales tax (and saves you from it as well), from Gizmodo. South Korea pardons former chairman of Samsung… a second time.  From the Wall Street Journal. Your text messages just got a little safer: The Times reports the Ohio Supreme Court has decided a Continue Reading →

Prison terms for Google executives in Italy?

An Italian prosecution against Google made the headlines again this week (New York Times, Bloomberg) with the news that prosecutors in Milan are pushing for three Google executives and one former executive to be sentenced to terms of imprisonment for their failure promptly to take down an offensive video from the Italian-language Google Video service in 2006. Readers in the U.S. and elsewhere may be baffled at the idea that the facts at issue should Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – November 27, 2009

The latest on the STLR radar: U.S. says butt out: U.S. Senators criticize EU Commission over delay of Oracle-Sun deal.  (See our deal cheat sheet here.) Verizon stakes its claim as the nation’s most ironic network: A week after a court called its “There’s a Map For That” advertisements “sneaky,” but not misleading (catch up here), Verizon has pushed the National Advertising Division of the Council of Better Business to ask Sprint to drop its Continue Reading →