STLR Link Roundup – March 5, 2010

The latest on the STLR radar: Out-Law reports on a US District Court for the Northern District of California case that clarifies how damages for groundless claims of copyright infringement should be determined. Apple is suing HTC over infringement of its user interface patents, but it’s really Google it’s after, says IP Watchdog. RealNetworks drops its appeal against a ruling declaring that its DVD-copying software violated the DMCA – Wired reports. Is it the car Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – February 27, 2010

A federal appeals court held that federal agents need not get warrants to search files shared over peer-to-peer networks, reports Wired. The Pentagon will now allow troops access to online social media like Twitter, YouTube, and MySpace, Business Weekly reports. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has given Google a license to trade energy on the wholesale market, as The Register reports. Notifications of website privacy policies do not appear to actually protect online privacy, the Continue Reading →

Prison terms for Google executives in Italy?

An Italian prosecution against Google made the headlines again this week (New York Times, Bloomberg) with the news that prosecutors in Milan are pushing for three Google executives and one former executive to be sentenced to terms of imprisonment for their failure promptly to take down an offensive video from the Italian-language Google Video service in 2006. Readers in the U.S. and elsewhere may be baffled at the idea that the facts at issue should Continue Reading →