This Book Will Self-Destruct In 26 Circulations

As eBooks proliferate, traditional print publishers are challenged to adapt to the changing market.  The latest obstacle involves the role of eBooks in libraries.  HarperCollins, one of six major U.S. publishers, recently announced changes in its eBook policy for libraries.  The new policy, reported by Library Journal, limits each copy of an eBook to twenty-six checkouts.  This means that a library must either discontinue an eBook’s circulation or purchase a new license after twenty-six checkouts.  Continue Reading →

Vernor v. Autodesk and the End of the First Sale Doctrine

The 9th Circuit’s Vernor v. Autodesk test demolishes the first sale doctrine by making its application contingent solely on the licensing agreement written by the copyright holder. Though the Vernor case centers on the distribution of software, there is no limiting principle that prevents the Vernor test from being applied broadly to all copyrighted works. Thus, the Vernor test, if upheld, it could mean the end of all markets for used copyrighted works. The First Continue Reading →

STLR Link Roundup – February 12, 2010

The latest on the STLR radar: Wired reports on Max Ray Vision’s thirteen-year sentence for hacking – the longest yet in U.S. legal history. The District Court for the Western District of Washington dismisses a lawsuit alleging that Microsoft misled its customers by representing anti-piracy code as a critical security update. ComputerWorld reports. The E-Commerce Times looks into codec licensing issues and what it means for the development of the next generation of HTML. The Register Continue Reading →